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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 90 (some duplicates have been removed)
should be a very, very limited. judy rights -- to keep me free to uphold the rule of law. to ensure a system of justice if i or we suffer injury in the physical sense or through fraud, the government cannot keep us safe. what should the role of government be in your life? we are asking you on this friday morning. on twitter -- clearly facing the constitution with the federal government is to do. 18 enumerations. the rest are reserved for the states and the people. next up caller, a republican from texas. good morning. caller: that would be kevin from texas. i believe the proper role of the federal government is to protect individual liberty. we are supposed to have a rules against fraud, against injury. the problem is the federal government has gone way beyond that. it wants to redistribute what people have gained through their liberties and freedom. once you do that, then you are violating the people's liberty. i think they have gone way too far. there telling us to buy light bulbs, what kind of cars to buy, what kind of insurance to have the. it is ridiculous, it really is. let th
see. here with it is cnn's kyon law. >>> dinner time means family time at the skillman household, from who is chopping to who's stirring. to who's sitting around the table and who soon won't. how hard is this for your family? >> not real sure. i don't think it's hit them yet. i really don't. >> reporter: a grandfather to three girls, his other title is master sergeant dan skillman, u.s. army reserves. he deploys to afghanistan in weeks, with his wife, master sergeant lola skillman and their oldest son, james, a sergeant. husband, wife, and son will be gone nine months as reserve support at kandahar. despite the 29 years that lola served, this will be her first time deployed to a war zone. are you scared at all? >> yes. some people say no, they're not scared, they're ready to go do this. but i think in the back of everybody's mind it is a little bit terrifying. >> reporter: at the skillman home where the unpaved road meets a montana big sky, they know about sacrifice for country. lola's father was awarded the purple heart during world war ii. dan's father joined the national guard. dan
, that's what we did. [applause] the new health care law helps make sure you don't have to worry about going broke just because you or a loved one gets sick. insurance companies can no longer put lifetime limits on your care. or jack up your premiums without reason. or drop your coverage when you need it most. they can no longer discriminate against children with pre-existing conditions. and soon they will no longer be able to deny you coverage based on pre-existing conditions like breast cancer or charge you more for the same care just because you're a woman. this law has already allowed nearly seven million young adults under the age of 26 to sign up and stay on their parents' health care plan. it's already saved millions of seniors on medicare hundreds of dollars on their prescription medicine. and millions of americans have actually gotten a rebate from their insurance company if that company -- you got one? [applause] i wanted to say -- i mean, she was a supporter. but i didn't know about -- [laughter] you get a rebate if the insurance company spent too much on demitch costs and c
law school graduates, romney also was a harvard mba, will square off and try to tell americans that they're very relatable. [laughter] we'll look forward to that. all right, chris, thank you. >> thank you. megyn: well, these debates, i mean, they're great theater for the american public, and they really do help a lot of americans decide whether it's just a visceral reaction or i like that guy better, they help americans decide. and a lot of the times it's the gaffes that turn people against the candidates. these campaigns, they're searching for the one defining moment, but of course they're also hoping it won't be an awkward one that sinks their campaign. recall 1992 when president george h.w. bush checks his watch during a debate with then-candidate bill clinton. the gesture gave voters the impression that he was impatient and uninterested. during the 2000 presidential debates, al gore got up in governor george w. bush's grill. look. [laughter] just a classic moment where he was invading his personal space a little, and, boy, did he take some flak. mr. bush gave him a nod and
. >> this isn't about terrorism. these are regular law enforcement investigations, and this is, this is, investigating people's communications. these are, who they talked to. who they e-mailed. who they engage in online conversations with, their friends, family, colleagues and loved once. >> reporter: here are some facts gathered by the aclu from justice department document. between 2009 and 2011 the number of orders for surveillance went up 60%. e-mails and network data, while smaller in number, increased by 361%. this type of information used to be gathered from devices attached right to the telephone but now, it can easily be retrieved by the phone company internally. aclu says it is done without a judge considering merits of the case. but the department of justice fired back saying in a statement, in every instance cited here the federal judge authorized law enforcement activity as criminals increasingly use new and sophisticated technologies use of orders used by a judge and strictly authorized by congress is essential for law enforcement to carry out its duty and to protect the pu
in the nation that has done this for kids and for teenagers. governor jerry brown signed this ban in into law over this past weekend and tweeted about it. let me read one of his tweets. this bill bans nonscientific, quote, therapies that have driven young people to depression and suicide. joining me is david pickup, a reparative therapist and spokesman for the national association of research and therapy of homosexuality, he is getting miked up. also with me right now is cnn's senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen. so, elizabeth, as we await david, just begin with what we know about this so-called reparative therapy. >> the american psychological association had a task force that took a long look at this. and here's what they came up with. they said there is no good studies showing it works or doesn't work. so no good studies showing this works. they say some people have been harmed by it, depression, other problems. and this is a quote, there is insufficient evidence to support the use of psychological interventions to change sexual orientation. >> okay. >> plainly spoken. >> hold tha
and florida as well. which is against the law . >> did you see governor chris christie. he's back. >> stop lying mr. president. >> lying? >> yes. that is what i say. >> gretchen: he doesn't stop there. and hear what he said about the media. >> eric: what does the numbers say. stewart varney here with what you need to know. hey! did you know that honey nut cheerios has oats that can help lower cholesterol? and it tastes good? sure does! wow. it's the honey, it makes it taste so... well, would you look at the time... what's the rush? be happy. be healthy. now we need a little bit more... a little bit more vanilla? this is great! [ male announcer ] at humana, we believe there's never been a better time to share your passions... because the results... are you having fun doing this? yeah. that's a very nice cake! [ male announcer ] well, you can't beat them. [ giggles ] ohh! you got something huh? whoa... [ male announcer ] humana understands the value of spending time together that's a lot of work getting that one in! let's go see the birdies. [ male announcer ] one on one, sharing
a good supreme court justice. after all he's picked a couple and taught constitutional law. he said over and over again for him this is all about what's in a judge's heart. when he nominated sonia sotomayor to the supreme court, president obama laid out his criteria for justices. chief among them empathy. >> it is experience that give a person common sense and touch and compassion and understanding of how the world works and how ordinary people live. and that is why it is a necessary ingredient in the kind of justice we need on the supreme court. >> reporter: it's a trait president obama probably wishes more justices shared when they decided citizens united, the case that largely removed independent corporate spending limits on federal political campaigns. he called out the high court during his 2010 state of the union address. >> with all due deference to separation of powers, last week the supreme court reversed a century of law that i believe will open the flood gates for special interests. >> reporter: four months later the president made sure to highlight similar themes when he nomi
is a harvard law grad, former assistant p.a., and peace corps volunteer. and now representing suburban boston in congress. the republican challenger, 37-year-old sean belot, is an ivy league educated marine. >> i have a decade in business. >> reporter: in a debate sunday, belot argued kennedy isn't ready and is coasting on the family coast tails. >> i don't think any other district in the country people would consider you qualified for this office. >> i've got a sizeable record of public service. >> reporter: joe, who introduced a tribute to ted kennedy at the democratic convention. >> for my uncle kennedy, politics was always about people. >> reporter: he says he knows his name comes with benefits. >> it's certainly an advantage, i'm very proud of my family's history of public service. >> reporter: spanning six decades of fabled and at times flawed history. jfk went to congress in 1947, before the camelot days of the white house. bobby and ted served in the senate. their sons, joe and patrick, in the house. and now it's joe's son who is on the ballot. and getting a boost from his grandmother
ideas and they were bad yds ideas. bad for america and i was fighting when you were practicing law and representing your contributor in his slum landlord business in chicago. bill: if you get an he change like that wednesday night, what's the likely impact on these uncommitted or spu -- thee voters. >> both of these guys have been through an awful lot of debates in their careers. they will be well prepared. the one thing that has to be cause for optimism for republicans. usually an incumbent president comes out rusty. we saw that in 1984, reagan's first debate was a disaster. george w. bush's debate was a disaster. i don't think it will be a disaster. but you saw on the univision interview. when you are abe incumbent president you are not used to being challenged. bill: what do you think the impact of a potential exchange like we just watched will have on this 15% rasmussen is talking about? >> rich is right. it depends on what it is. there was another debate moment in 2008 that seemed to change the trajectory a little bit. remember when hillary was told people don't like her and s
the contractors it is not necessary to send outlay off notices 60 days ahead of the defense cuts as the law requires. the argument is because there is uncertainty about if the spending cuts will happen and the effect they would have. a top legal expert says that is not following the spirit of the law. >> the administration did not give the specifics required by law as to what plants would be affected and said the act is nullified because of that. the whole purpose of the act is to give workers forewarning and that is what is missing here. if things don't go well, these workers will go over the cliff in the game of chicken. >>reporter: both the president and members of congress are on the campaign trail so the earliest this can be worked out is after the election when the pressure will be on. >>trace: and the clock ticks. some republican lawmakers are not too thrilled the way this is handles. >>reporter: that is right. the administration has told the defense contractors if they get sued for not sending outlay off notices, the government will pick up the tab. senator graham said this is typic
was rejected from the un oo university un of texas because of her race. gay marriage laws and hear challenge to the voting rights act. >>> a fox news alert for you. three nato troops and a translator killed in a homicide bombing in eastern afghanistan along with at least 10 other people. the attacker drove a motorcycle packed with explosives right into the troops that were patrolling a market. the taliban claiming responsibility for this. the attack comes a day after two americans were killed in a shootout between afghan american troops. >>> two people are dead and one person in critical condition after a shooting at a florida vfw post. a motorcycle club several arms men reportedly showed up firing weapons. it looked like a fight between two motorcycle groups. several people were arrested but no one has been charged yet. >>> a cameraman who accompanied iran's president for the u.n. general assembly is seeking asylum. he didn't say when he defected. this comes a week after mahmoud ahmadinej ahmadinejad's top advisor gave controversial material about the premiere leader. lindsay lohan can'tut
beaten to death. was written cabin" very much as a protest novel to the fugitive a state law or anyone in the north, including new england, with the abolitionists and -- if anyone in the northwest to aid or abet a fugitive slave, they themselves would be imprisoned or fine for breaking the law. this was seen as a compromise between the north and south to avoid war. that was part of what the novel was trying to do, to say, listen, i am a person, harriet beecher stowe, and i'm against slavery, as was much of new england, and i just my right to call a slave who finds him or herself -- t.s. my right to help the slave who finds him or herself within our borders. >> more about it. beecher stowe this weekend as -- or about. beecher stowe this weekend as we look behind the history and literary history of augusta, maine. sunday at 5:00 p.m. on american history tv on c-span3. >> almost 20 years ago, we broadcast one of the most controversial stories in our 44 years on the air. it was called "yes, but is it art?" at was accused of being a philistines, someone without the ability to appreciate con
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on whether a voter i.d. law that could swing a state that hasn't been a swing state but maybe put it is back in if it's put into place. and ballots are now being cast in another key battleground state. up to 35 states voting now. >>> today's trivia question. which politician has participated in the most general election presidential debates? tweet me the answer @ chucktodd. we'll be right back. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 let's talk about low-cost investing. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 at schwab, we're committed to offering you tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 low-cost investment options-- tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 like our exchange traded funds, or etfs tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 which now have the lowest tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 operating expenses tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 in their respective tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 lipper categories. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 lower than spdr tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and even lower than vanguard. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 that means with schwab, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 your portfolio has tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 a better chance to grow. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and you can trade all our
committee, senator lindsey graham, says we are in danger of no longer being a rule of law nation. >> this is a huge deal and it is a mini queue. you're having the executive branch unilaterally telling the private sector to ignore a congressional statute, again, what kind of precedents in the future? >> he's angry will about this memo which says, quote, dol, department of labor, concluded that it is neither necessary nor appropriate for federal contractors to provide act notice to employees 60 days in advance of the potential sequestration because of uncertainty about whether sequestration will occur and if it did, what effect it would have on particular contracts. the administration also notes even if this sequester were to occur, the pentagon does not expect to terminate or substantially modify contracts until months after january 2. lockheed martin is one defense contractor that has said it will honor the administration's request to hold off sending outlay-off notices. the defense contractors have been assured if there are lawsuits filed against them, the administration is plan
laws in place. one involves therapy to try to keep people from being gay. >>> and the san francisco giants already clinched their playoff spot. now the as are this close to earning a postseason berth. ♪ places it will take you. ♪ dreams it will make come true. ♪ with technology and style to match your achievements and desires. ♪ the question is where will your new es take you? ♪ introducing the all-new lexus es. ♪ starting at $6.99. our tri-tip with hand-breaded onion straws, our crispy shrimp smothered in bang bang sauce, and tuscan chicken on focaccia. sizzler. >>> this is 7th from middle hare bore. i can see it -- hare bore. you can see from -- harbor. you can see it from the ground. >>> texas is city shaking from an earthquake. it happened late saturday night and was centered in irving texas, that's a disturb of dallas. walls crack and pictures were knocked off walls but no manger damage was reported. >> the couch actually shook side to side. it actually -- you felt the tremor coming through. >> seismologists say these are not unusual to texas although it is not home
laws, the ban on the xl pipeline, the enforcement of labor laws -- those policies have killed thousands and thousands of jobs and collectively, we are making it incredibly difficult for small businesses to drive, much less -- thrive, much less survive. >> so if you have 65% of spending going to individual payments, what would you do to try to reduce that? >> in order to create more jobs, we have to control the national debt. i think that is what we have to do. i have said it from the beginning. i have given a plan to try to deal with it. this idea that somehow mr. cruz is lecturing us on standing on our own feet, i find incredible. he spent most of your adult life working for the government. you have not created jobs. you have not on your own business. i have. my wife and i own a retail store. we did not have the federal government with their boots on our neck. when george bush was president, we lost 700,000 jobs per month. all these programs were in place at the time. the only addition is the health care act, which has not been fully implemented. i think that you have a selective memor
for their trust, earn their support and eventually their vote. >> reporter: he is a harvard law grad, peace corps volunteer. now representing suburban boston. >> i have a decade in business, helping grow companies. >> reporter: in a debate televised sunday, he argued kennedy isn't ready and is coasting on the family coat tail. >> i don't think in any other state or district in the country people would consider you're qualified for this office. >> i have a sizable record of public service. >> reporter: joe who introduced a tribute to ted kennedy at the democratic convention. >> for my uncle teddy, politics was always about people. >> reporter: he knows his famous name comes with benefits. >> it is an advantage, i am proud of my family's history of public service. >> reporter: spanning six decades of sometimes a flawed history. jfk went to congress in '47 before the camelot days of the white house. bobby and ted served in the senate. their sons, joe and patrick, in the house. now joe's son who is on the ballot, getting a boost from his grandmother ethel. >> she has been on a number of campaign stop
in her purse. >>> so finding a cure for miners will soon be against the law in california. the state is the first in the nation to ban so-called gay conversion therapies targeting children and teenagers. this law takes effect in january. >> thank you for the update. our team, richard socarides sitting right next to me so i can stop him when i need to. he's worked with the new yorker dotcom, he writes for them, former senior adviser to president clinton. ron brownstein at the other side of the table, editorial director of national journal and kellyanne conway is the president of the polling company women trend. nice to have you with us. our get real this morning. this one is so disturbing to me. 7-year-old girl gets food stuck in her hair. you have a 7-year-old so you know this age well. the assistant teacher decides to remove the food from her hair. how does she do it? by cutting the girl's hair off. apparently removed, well the mother believes, the mother's name is jessica sturwalt in north carolina. she says it was seven or eight inches of hair that they cut off this little girl. t
law. you might remember it. today the court begins a new term and it could bring more high-profile rulings on issues from affirmative action to gay marriages. pete is at the supreme court. well, look. it's going to be some landmark decisions. it seems they're coming down in the way the court is signaling in the cases it took. is that a fair way to interpret all this, pete? >> so far it's taken one case on affirmative action, chuck. it's a big case. a challenge by a white student to the universities consideration of race in rounding out the freshman class. the last time the supreme court looked aet this nine years ago, it upheld the affirmative action. that was written by sandra day o'connor. she's left. alito has taken over. the requirement that in states that have a history of racial discrimination, that they have to get federal permission before they make any changes in their elections. it's widely expected the court will grant that kay. feeble the regulation for same-sex marriage. the court hasn't decided this act yet either. it's with a virtual certainty the court will
. the law that people marched and died for. the law that is now under attack by voter i.d. laws. the supreme court may decide whether key revisions should stand nearly five decades later. how do justices rule in these cases will affect millions of americans. who can go to college, who can get married, who can vote. that's why this election is so important. whoever is elected president next month will likely appoint at least just one new justice to the court and it's no mystery what a romney supreme court would look like. here's what he said back in december during the primary debates. >> yes, roberts, thomas, alito, and scalia. >> those are four justices that are the most conservative on the bench. they all ruled against abortion rights, against equal pay, and for unlimited political donation for corporations. yes, this is not about who likes the president or not. sure he's likeable. this is not about all of the side bar issues. this is about what we fundamentally stand
's health care law. >>> overseas now to afghanistan and a stark reminder tonight of the human cost of war. an attack at a checkpoint left two americans dead, one a serviceman. the 2,000th u.s. military death since the war began. abc's muhammad lila is in the region tonight for us. muhammad. >> reporter: david, some officials are describing this as a firefight between american troops and the very afghan soldiers they were working alongside. for reasons that aren't yet clear, it appears as though there were some sort of confrontation at one of the many checkpoints that american troops are often stationed at. there was an exchange of gunfire. at first the coalition called it an insider attack at the hands of afghan forces, but later they said the taliban might have been involved. now, whatever the reason, the 2,000th american killed in afghanistan is certainly a very grim milestone. this comes just as we are days away from the 11-year anniversary of combat in afghanistan, and there is another number to consider, 68,000 american troops are now in afghanistan increasingly under threat not just
health care law last june. so how might mitt romney change the high court if he becomes president of the united states? he's already giving all of us some major clues. let's bring in cnn's crime and justice correspondent joe johns who's taking a closer look. what are you seeing? >> the supreme court doesn't get talked about that much on the campaign trail. but choosing a justice is one of the most important things a president does. it's how on administration puts its mark on some of the nation east toughest, most divisive issues. and we have a look at how mitt romney might handle it if he's president. whenever mitt romney fielded questions during the primaries about his picks for the supreme court, he was armed with a stock republican answer. >> what i would look to do would be to appoint people to the supreme court that will follow strictly the constitution as opposed to to legislating from the bench. >> reporter: but he wouldn't choose a favorite. >> would you pick one, please? >> yes, roberts, thomas, alito and scalia. >> reporter: all that changed in june when roberts cast the
's solve this. >>> just this morning a pennsylvania judge blocked a controversial voter i.d. law from taking effect this november, the same law that won top state republican said would help mitt romney win pennsylvania. most republicans usually don't admit as much, prefrg to frame their efforts around, quote, preventing voter fraud. but in a twist it appears that republicans may be the ones responsible for all the suspicious activity this year. last week the rnc fired a group called strategic allied consulting after accused of submitting fraudulent voter registration forms. if the republican party was shocked, perhaps it shouldn't have been. the firm is owned by a gop operative named nathan stroul sproul whose voter activities were investigated by the justice department though no charges filed. in a sign of people who want to legitimately exercise their right to vote, voters in ohio slept on the street overnight to be the first to cast their ballots when early voting began this morning in that state. joining us now is the host of politics nation, here on msnbc, the one, the only, reve
law rocked the legal world? and that's not all. there are several big cases coming up, big issues that become part of the conversation in the presidential race if they aren't already. pete williams is at the supreme court. all right, pete. let's start with some of the top cases. one by one, affirmative action. >> virtually every college in america that's selected uses affirmative action in some ways to achieve a racially diverse campus. this better prepares students for the working world. upheld nine years ago, but this time it faces a new challenge with the big change on the courts. who wrote that opinion upholding it is gone replaced by samuel alito. the case o comes from the university of texas which allows basically every top academyive performer in a texas high school, guarantees them submission. one factor they look at in rounding out the class, the question is whether they discriminates, it's challenged by a white student who failed to get in. >> we heard a lot during the primaries about gay marriage. tell us about the act. >> signed by president clinton defines marriage be
: this just in. judge blocks voter id law in pennsylvania. >> that's good. it will give us at least some time to try to get people indication. that's the problem we're less than six weeks out now. >> stephanie: exactly. are we very excited about our debate coverage tomorrow. >> i cannot wait. >> stephanie: i know. and then i'm going to stay there and drink, and watch the debate and taunt you. >> that's what i heard. >> you are just going to destroy the sets -- >> she is going to be a little clingy. >> stephanie: i don't get to see her in person very often, so i'm like a kowala. she'll have to pry me off of her. >> i don't know if you tune in to "the young turks" in the afternoon, but she does a lot of twitter stuff. >> stephanie: and you guys are like the a-team. we're not even prime time. we'll be like little match girls -- and then the a-team will do post debate coverage. >> yes. it is past my bedtime but i'll be forced to attend. >> stephanie: everybody is doing it from new york. >> the big guys. stepchildren are here in l.a. >> stephanie: yeah, we're going to be drinki
justices in the mold of the chief justice john roberts. now that he's voted to uphold this law, would you still knowing what we know now, nominate a justice like john roberts? >> well, i certainly wouldn't nominate someone who i knew was going to come out with a decision that i rehemently disagreed with. >> joining me now is jeffrey toobin. voting for the united states senator is the number one reason to vote for them since they confirm these nominations. i just want to show you a moment that just occurred in the massachusetts senate debate tonight between scott brown and elizabeth warren. let's listen to that. >> who's your model supreme court justice? >> let me see here. that's a great question. i think justice scalia is a very good judge. justice kennedy. the i think they're very qualified people there. >> >> miss warren who would be your model supreme court justice. >> i think it would probably be elena kagan. >> jeff toobin, it seemed elizabeth warren got that right the first time. we saw scott brown move from left to right. >> it looked like he was sort of randomly picking names out
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 90 (some duplicates have been removed)